Category: Economy

Back to 1945: it’s time to make sure Britain can feed itself again.

Tom Serpell

Food security in the UK is threatened by multi-national companies moving production abroad and by just in time deliveries being threatened by a variety of obstacles, including Brexit, Covid and the war in Ukraine. Even more disastrous has been the hike in energy prices which has increase the price of even the most basic food. The government must find some solutions to a looming catastrophe which is partly of its own making

WTF Prime Minister! Working From Home works

Rick Dillon

Boris Johnson has come down heavily against working from home. But the evidence points a different way. Millions now take advantage of different ways of doing their jobs, including dividing their working life between office and home.

One year on: in search of Brexit benefits

Alison Rees

Brexit leaves us worse off, with UK-EU trade hit particularly hard. Many small businesses have ceased to import or export altogether. The government has consistently overpromised and overstated Brexit benefits. Unsurprisingly then, a recent survey found growing dissatisfaction with the EU-UK trade deal among both Remain and Leave voters.

BREXIT VOTE FIVE YEARS ON

So, after all the promises: is Brexit really done?

Dorothy Smith

In the light of all the propaganda, no doubt some people were persuaded by the slogan’Get Brexit done’, to change their vote at the last general election, imagining that, after Brexit, things would change for the better.  On the day the UK officially left the EU, 31 January 2020, Britain’s exit was presented by Boris […]

The unkindest cut – real life stories

Sussex Bylines
Woman looking at the "Keep the lifeline" petition on her smart phone

We invited Sussex Bylines readers to share their personal experiences of how the government’s planned Universal Credit cut will affect them. We have already received some courageous responses that make for sobering – and in some cases, heartbreaking – reading…

UPDATED

The unkindest cut of all

Ginny Smith
Tories Foodbank Soup cans mural in London by artist Georgie

Despite dire predictions and warnings, Johnson’s government seems determined to cut the £20 a week “uplift” payments for Universal Credit recipients. Yet as critics of the move point out, this cut is not only cruel and ill-timed, but doesn’t even make economic sense…

TOXIC SHOCK

Profits from pollution: how private monopoly Southern Water is failing the public

Ginny Smith & Rick Dillon
Protesters on a Hastings beach following yet another sewage spill by Southern Water

A spate of sewage discharges and spills into our seas and rivers is prompting protests as demands grow across Sussex for Southern Water to clean up its act and stop putting profits ahead of clean water. As a private monopoly it is accountable to its shareholders rather than its customers, but a growing number of campaigners believe it’s time to bring it back into public ownership.

A win for rogue landlords as Tories block council licensing

Rick Dillon
Members of Acorn, the renters' union, protesting in Hove regarding landlord licensing

Lack of repairs creates misery for thousands in private rented accommodation. But getting councils to back a scheme that forces landlords to act is only the first step and, so far, applications to renew council licensing are being turned down by the Conservative Housing Minister Robert Jenrick.

What legacy do you want to leave?

Tom Serpell
An adoring grandfather holds up his infant grandchild, who is smiling back

A retired, lifelong left-of-centre activist ponders what constitutes a meaningful legacy, and worries his generation is failing to leave the next with the right kind of wealth…

NEW WRITER

The mysterious case of the burnt banknote

Michael Green
Image of a burning £50 note; a Union flag in the background.

Conservative orthodoxy tells us that balancing the books of the public economy is both good business and good for business. The last ten years suggest that this is partially or wholly untrue. But why is this model so broken? Michael Green gets his hands dirty digging into the economy’s oily bits.